‘Pro-active project planning’

Without a clear plan, one hopes for the best.

For example:

  • You hope you properly understood what your boss or client wanted.
  • Hoping for the best
    confronts you unwillingly with pressing deadlines.
  • Sometimes the task ahead is not known in all its details; therefore, you tend to underestimate the time required to completion.

Hope, for all the good it brings, is a terrible thing to rely on when you have deadlines to meet. One doesn’t want to hope to get it right, because of the consequences, e.g.:

  • lack of direction can cause lack of motivation;
  • if a project isn’t explicitly laid out, it’s easy to procrastinate;
  • if there’s no clear first step, it makes it hard to know if you’re starting the right way.

Echteld Consults supports with:

In this workshop, we’ll teach you how to pro-actively plan your projects, and reduce your ad hoc situations. You’ll learn how to set clear goals; desired outcomes and the importance to share your scope of work.

Elements of the approach:

  • The natural planning process.
  • Getting- Things-Done methodology by David Allen.

Result:

Professionals able to pro-actively plan.